Fulfilling A Dream in Singapore

Published September 30, 2017
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This post is part of my Bakbakan 2015 series of posts, narrating my first ever travel out of the Philippines, on my own, to 5 countries. Click here to see the summary and full itinerary!

The journey to Singapore was about 6 hours, including the long lines at the border. After we got our exit stamps in Malaysia, we got on the bus, crossed the bridge connecting the two countries, and got off at the Singapore immigration building to get our entry stamps.

We arrived at Singapore by 5PM, and the bus dropped us off somewhere in Kallang (as far as I remember). I took the MRT to Little India to find an accommodation, but had no luck, so I went to Clark Quay instead and found a decent dorm. I checked in, left my bags and walked to Merlion Park to take those mandatory tourist shots.

Merlion Parks at night

I woke up really early to check-out, find a new hostel, and promise myself to never not book-in-advance ever again. I went to Chinatown and found this really cute dorm and booked it even if it’s really expensive. You’re not ready for its name, it’s called The Bohemian Chic Hostel. First of all, wow, second’f’ll, why? It’s not just Bohemian, it’s also Chic! huh! How perfect for me! Anywayss, that hostel was amazing. I paid 35 SGD a night for a capsule-type bed, with own TV, RFID lockers, free breakfast, and a non-stop streaming of PostmodernJukebox Youtube channel at the lobby. Pretty worth it to be honest. And the owner, or manager, I’m not sure, was very involved in making sure that guests are having a great time, not only at their place but also at Singapore as a whole.

I couldn’t check in yet because it was still early in the morning, so I only left my bags, and went on to exploring. I took the MRT to the Gardens by the Bay area, and walked around for a couple of hours.

Giant “trees” at Gardens by the Bay

I went back to my hostel to officially check in, then went out again, this time to explore the Orchard Road area. Comparing it to a place from this trip, it was almost the same as Hong Kong Central. Basically where you can find a lot of things Filipino. I bought souvenirs at Lucky Plaza (they’re the cheapest at upper floors, innermost stalls), and ate at Jollibee (obviously).

At night, I walked around Chinatown, before going back to my hostel, and bought a discounted Universal Studios ticket at the hostel lobby.

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When USS first opened, I was super excited, especially for the Battlestar Galactica Dueling Coasters (Human vs Cyclon). Sadly, it had lots of issues, with the coaster car and all that, so they had it in maintenance for quite a while. Luckily they re-opened the coasters the year of this trip so my dream of riding them would actually come true. As I entered the park, I immediately ran to queue for the Cyclon coaster (it’s the more intense one, with 5 inversions and your feet dangling in the air). The line wasn’t that long, so I got to ride it after queueing up for about 30 minutes. I felt so rushed with adrenaline, I didn’t even get dizzy from all the inversions. After that, I circled the park a couple times throughout the day, and then rode the Human track before the park closes. I wasn’t expecting much, but I actually liked it as much as its counterpart. It didn’t have any inversions, but the airtime, drops, and turns, made up for a surprisingly thrilling ride.

Battlestar Galactica: Cylon in action

Day 20! Whew! So for the last day of this insanity, I was a little chill, and didn’t really do much. Before checking out of my hostel, I watched a couple of episodes of Quantico from the tv in my bunk (it has a local Netflix-like app with hundreds of tv shows and movies). Then I strolled through Chinatown one last time, and passed time at the hostel lobby. At around 2PM, I rode the MRT to the Changi City Point Mall, bought a few more souvenirs, before going to the airport to catch my flight back to Manila.

Changi Airport late in the afternoon

Click here to continue to the last part: “How Backpacking 5 Countries On My Own Changed Me”

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